The Cherry Tree Carol arr. David Willcocks (Kings’ College Choir)

Kings’ College Choir

 

The ballad relates an apocryphal story of the Virgin Mary, presumably while traveling to Bethlehem with Joseph for the census. In the most popular version, the two stop in a cherry orchard, and Mary asks her husband to pick cherries for her, citing her child. Joseph spitefully tells Mary to let the child’s father pick her cherries.
At this point in most versions, the infant Jesus, from the womb, speaks to the tree and commands it to lower a branch down to Mary, which it does. Joseph, witnessing this miracle, immediately repents his harsh words. The more contemporary versions sometimes end here, while others often include an angel appearing to Joseph and telling him of the circumstances of Jesus’s birth. Other versions then jump ahead several years, where the next verse picks up with Jesus on his mother’s lap, telling her of his eventual death and resurrection.

Joseph was an old man and an old man was he
When he married Mary in the land of Galilee. 

And as they were walking through an orchard so good, 
There were cherries and berries as red as any blood. 

O, then bespoke Mary with words so meek and mild, 
“Pluck me one cherry, Joseph, for that I am with child.”

“Go to the tree, then, Mary, and it shall bow to thee
And you shall gather cherries, by one, by two, by three.”

Then bowed down the highest tree unto our lady’s hand. 
“See!” Mary cried, “see, Joseph! I have cherries at command!”

“Go eat your cherries, Mary, go eat your cherries now. 
Go eat your cherries, Mary, that grow upon the bough.”

Then Mary plucked a cherry as red as any blood. 
Then Mary went she homewards all with her heavy load.

Kings College Choir: On Christmas Night

Kings College Choir

On Christmas night all Christians sing 
To hear the news the angels bring 
On Christmas night all Christians sing 
To hear the news the angels bring 
News of great joy, news of great mirth 
News of our merciful 
King’s birth.

Then why should men on earth be sad 
Since our Redeemer made us glad 
Then why should we on earth be sad 
Since our Redeemer made us glad 
When from our sin, He set us free 
All for to gain our liberty.

When sin departs before Your grace 
Then life and health come in its place 
When sin departs before Your grace 
Then life and health come in its place 
Angels and men 
with joy may sing 
All for to see the 
newborn King.

All out of darkness we have light 
Which made the angels sing this night 
All out of darkness we have light 
Which made the angels sing this night 
Glory to God and peace to men 
Now and forevermore. Amen.”

King`s College Choir, Cambridge – God rest you merry gentlemen

King`s College Choir,

King`s College Choir, Cambridge – God rest you merry gentlemen (Carols from King 2001)

God rest, you merry gentlemen 
Let nothing you dismay 
Remember Christ our savior 
Was born on Christmas day 
To save us all from Satan’s pow’r 
When we were gone astray 

O tidings of comfort and joy 
Comfort and joy 
O tidings of comfort and joy 
[ Lyrics from: http://www.lyricsfreak.com/p/peter+cetera/god+rest+you+merry+gentlemen_20767295.html ] 
From God our heavenly father 
A blessed angel came 
And unto certain shepherds 
Brought tidings of the same 
How that in Bethlehem was born 
The son of God by name 

O tidings of comfort and joy 
Comfort and joy 
O tidings of comfort and joy 

How that in Bethlehem was born 
The son of God by name 

O tidings of comfort and joy 
Comfort and joy 
O tidings of comfort and joy

When I Survey The Wondrous Cross : Choir Of Kings College, Cambridge

Choir Of Kings College

Isaac Watts’ wonderful hymn When I Survey The Wondrous Cross beautifully sung by the choir of Kings College, Cambridge to the lovely tune Rockingham. Splendid descants from the boys. 

When I Survey The Wondrous Cross Hymn
When I survey the wondrous cross
On which the Prince of glory died,
My richest gain I count but loss,
And pour contempt on all my pride.

Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast,
Save in the death of Christ my God!
All the vain things that charm me most,
I sacrifice them to His blood.

See from His head, His hands, His feet,
Sorrow and love flow mingled down!
Did eer such love and sorrow meet,
Or thorns compose so rich a crown?

His dying crimson, like a robe,
Spreads oer His body on the tree;
Then I am dead to all the globe,
And all the globe is dead to me.

Were the whole realm of nature mine,
That were a present far too small;
Love so amazing, so divine,
Demands my soul, my life, my all.

King’s College Choir: O Come All Ye Faithful

King’s College Choir

 

Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful

Oh, come, all ye faithful,
Joyful and triumphant!
Oh, come ye, oh, come ye to Bethlehem;
Come and behold him
Born the king of angels:
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Christ the Lord.

Highest, most holy,
Light of light eternal,
Born of a virgin,
A mortal he comes;
Son of the Father
Now in flesh appearing!
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Christ the Lord.

Sing, choirs of angels,
Sing in exultation,
Sing, all ye citizens of heaven above!
Glory to God
In the highest:
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Christ the Lord.

Yea, Lord, we greet thee,
Born this happy morning;
Jesus, to thee be glory given!
Word of the Father,
Now in flesh appearing!
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Oh, come, let us adore him,
Christ the Lord

Kings College Choir Cambridge – A Child is Born in Bethlehem

Kings College Choir Cambridge

 

A Child Is Born In Bethlehem (Samuel Scheidt)
Kings College Choir Cambridge
Favourite Carols from King’s

Samuel Scheidt (baptized November 3, 1587 – March 24, 1653) was a German composer, organist and teacher of the early Baroque era.

He was born in Halle, and after early studies there, he went to Amsterdam to study with Sweelinck, the distinguished Dutch composer, which was clearly formative on his style. On his return to Halle he became court organist, and later Kapellmeister, to the Margrave of Brandenburg. Unlike many German musicians, for example Heinrich Schütz, he remained in Germany during the Thirty Years’ War, managing to survive by teaching and by taking a succession of smaller jobs until the restoration of stability allowed him to resume his post as Kapellmeister.

Scheidt was the first internationally significant German Baroque composer for the organ, and represents the flowering of the new north German style, which occurred largely as a result of the Protestant Reformation. In south Germany and some other countries of Europe, the spiritual and artistic influence of Rome remained strong, so most music continued to be derivative of Italian models. Cut off from Rome, musicians in the newly Protestant areas readily developed new stylistic ideas which were much different from the practice of their neighbors.

Scheidt’s music is in two principal categories: instrumental music, including a large amount of keyboard music, mostly for organ; and sacred vocal music, some of which is a cappella and some of which uses a basso continuo or other instrumental accompaniment. His organ music was famous at the time, though since then it has been eclipsed by the music of J.S. Bach. In his numerous chorale preludes, Scheidt often used a “patterned variation” technique, in which each phrase of the chorale uses a different rhythmic motive, and each variation (consisting of the several phrases) is more elaborate than the previous, until the climax of the composition is reached. In addition to his chorale preludes, he wrote numerous fugues, suites of dances (which were often in a cyclic form, sharing a common ground bass) and fantasias.

He also produced a large quantity of vocal music, both sacred and secular, much of which survives.

Hat Tio

Hark! The Herald Angels Sing

King’s College Choir

“Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” is a Christmas hymn or carol written by Charles Wesley, brother of the Methodist movement founder John Wesley. It first appeared in Hymns and Sacred Poems in 1739, [1] under the topic of “Hymn for Christmas-Day”. The original opening couplet was “Hark! how all the welkin rings / Glory to the King of Kings”. The version known today is the result of alterations by various hands, most notably George Whitefield, Wesley’s co-worker, who changed the opening couplet to the familiar one we know today.

The tune that is normally used for this carol is based on a chorus composed by Felix Mendelssohn in 1840, part of his cantata Festgesang zur Eröffnung der am ersten Tage der vierten Säkularfeier der Erfindung der Buchdruckerkunst (“Festival Song .. to commemorate the invention of book printing.”) [2].
This hymn was regarded as one of the Great Four Anglican Hymns and published as number 403 in “The Church Hymn Book” (In New York and Chicago, USA, 1872). [3] in the 19th century.


In the UK Hark! The Herald Angels Sing has popularly been performed in an arrangement that maintains the basic original William Hayman Cummings harmonisation of the Mendelssohn tune for the first two verses but adds a soprano descant and a last verse harmonisation for the organ in verse 3 by Sir David Willcocks. This arrangement was first published in 1961 by Oxford University Press in the first book of the Carols for Choirs series. For many years it has served as the recessional hymn of the annual Service of Nine Lessons and Carols in King’s College Chapel, Cambridge.

Hark! The herald angels sing,
Glory to the newborn King;
Peace on earth, and mercy mild,
God and sinners reconciled!
Joyful, all ye nations rise,
Join the triumph of the skies;
With thangelic host proclaim,
Christ is born in Bethlehem!

Refrain

Hark! the herald angels sing,
Glory to the newborn King!

Christ, by highest Heavn adored;
Christ the everlasting Lord;
Late in time, behold Him come,
Offspring of a virgins womb.
Veiled in flesh the Godhead see;
Hail thincarnate Deity,
Pleased with us in flesh to dwell,
Jesus our Emmanuel.

Refrain

Hail the heavnly Prince of Peace!
Hail the Sun of Righteousness!
Light and life to all He brings,
Risn with healing in His wings.
Mild He lays His glory by,
Born that man no more may die.
Born to raise the sons of earth,
Born to give them second birth.

Refrain

King’s College Choir – Jesus Christ is risen today

Kings college Choir

 

The Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, sings the famous Easter hymn Jesus Christ is risen today. Conductor Stephen Cleobury.

Le Chœur du King’s College de Cambridge chante le cantique de Pâques Jesus Christ is risen today (Jésus Christ est ressuscité aujourd’hui). Direction Stephen Cleobury.